Models

The models we use provide the basis for the work we do. They give a clear picture of how an entire organization can work together to achieve real results. If you're new to any of them, we've provided an introduction and some helpful links below so you can familiarize yourself with them, share them, and create common language amongst your team members as you pursue greater organizational health.

 

The Governance Excellence Model (GEM)

STRIVE!'s Governance Excellence Model (GEM) illustrates the keys for boards to do their part in making their organizations successful. Shown as a diamond—a GEM—it has six facets or areas of responsibility. There are disciplines associated with each area of responsibility and these disciplines capture the essence of the board's work.

This model is discussed in detail in Jim Brown's The Imperfect Board Member.

The Secret Formula for Organizational Effectiveness

We don’t want to keep The Secret Formula for Organizational Effectiveness™ hush-hush. In fact we want the world to know and use it! Our proven organizational model clarifies the roles and relationships within an effective organization. Defining the lines of communication, authority, and accountability to and from your board will set your organization on its way to resilience and prosperity. 

This model is discussed in detail in Jim Brown's The Imperfect Board Member.

 
 

Organizational Health Model

Organizational health is about making a company function effectively by building a cohesive leadership team, establishing real clarity among those leaders, communicating that clarity to everyone within the organization and putting in place just enough structure to reinforce that clarity going forward.

This model, property of The Table Group, is discussed in detail in Patrick Lencioni's The Advantage.

The Five Dysfunctions of a Team

The Five Dysfunctions of a Team

The Five Dysfunctions of a Team outlines the root causes of politics and dysfunction on the teams where you work, and the keys to overcoming them. Counter to conventional wisdom, the causes of dysfunction are both identifiable and curable. However, they don't die easily. Making a team functional and cohesive requires levels of courage and discipline that many groups cannot seem to muster.

This model, property of The Table Group, is discussed in detail in Patrick Lencioni's The Five Dysfunctions of a Team.